streamflow

Delaware Geological Survey Issues Report on Wastewater Treatment used for Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems

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The Delaware Geological Survey released a new technical report entitled “Evaluation Of Wastewater Treatment Options Used In Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems (RIBS)” which was prepared by Müserref Türkmen of the Izmir Water and Sewearge Administration, Turkey, A. Scott Andres of the Delaware Geological Survey, Edward Walther of the South Water Management District, Florida, and William Ritter and Anastasia Chirnside of the University’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. DGS Bulletin 21A documents the results of a detailed study of wastewater treatment plant technologies and effectiveness of treatment types that are used to treat wastewater prior to disposal into the ground by rapid infiltration basin systems.

DGS welcomes James D. Hanes to UD NEWRNet project

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Environmental Sciences student James Hanes (BS 2016) has accepted a Water Resources Center Undergraduate Internship for Fall 2015 to work with A. Scott Andres of DGS, and William Ullman and Christopher Main of the School of Marine Science and Policy at the University of Delaware. James will work on high-frequency environmental data collected by the North East Water Resources Network (NEWRNet) project (http://www.dgs.udel.edu/projects/newrnet-north-east-water-resources-net…), an NSF-EPSCoR funded project that includes investigators and students from the Universities of Delaware, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

Development of a High Water Mark Database and Display System for Coastal Flooding Events in Delaware

Project Contact(s)

DGS is building a database and web distribution system to collect, manage, and display high water marks (HWMs) that are observed throughout Delaware as a result of flooding events. Historical peak water levels can be extracted for past storms or for a selected geographic area. Development is being done in partnership with the Office of the Delaware State Climatologist, the Delaware Environmental Observing System (DEOS) and the Delaware Environmental Monitoring and Analysis Center (DEMAC).

NEWRnet - North East Water Resources Network

Project Contact(s)

The North East Water Resources (NEWRnet) consortium of EPSCoR jurisdictions of Delaware (DE), Rhode Island (RI), and Vermont (VT) will create an advanced sensor network in watersheds for gathering high-frequency, spatially-extensive water quality and quantity data and a network of lab and field-based experiments and agent-based models to investigate how to align sensor data and their visualization with utilization by stakeholders. DGS is participating in the watershed sensing network by installing and operating a nitrogen and organic carbon sensor and stream discharge monitoring station in the Murderkill River watershed, and collaborating with the project team to interpret results.

Hurricane Sandy Q&A - Experts at UD aid state, National Weather Service during storm

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4:37 p.m., Oct. 31, 2012--The Office of the State Climatologist and the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS), both based at the University of Delaware, provided the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) and the National Weather Service with weather, coastal flooding and stream flooding information for Delaware during Hurricane Sandy.

Stream and Tide Gage Data for Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy was a major storm event for the tidal areas of Delaware. As a part of the mission of the Delaware Geological Survey, we have compiled preliminary data related to Delaware tide and stream levels related to the Hurricane Sandy and compared them with previous flooding records.

The Delaware Water Conditions Summary

The Water Conditions Summary is an online monthly summary of water conditions in Delaware. Principal factors in determining water conditions are precipitation, streamflow, and groundwater levels in aquifers. Data from rain gages, stream gages, and observation wells located throughout Delaware have been collected and compiled since the 1960s by the Delaware Geological Survey. These data are displayed as hydrographs and are also available for download. In general, water is abundant in Delaware, but supply is restricted by natural geologic conditions in some areas, by contamination in others, and is dependent on precipitation.