GIS

Web-Delivered Application for Hydrogeologic Data

Project Contact(s)

This project is designed to deliver, by web-based technologies, the most commonly available and requested geologic and hydrologic information used in hydrologic studies required by regulation and ordinance and used by state agencies to support resource-management decisions. Available information can be associated with points or areas. Information associated with points includes descriptive logs, geophysical logs, raw and interpreted groundwater levels, aquifer and geologic unit identification, and hydraulic characteristics of wells. Information associated with areas is either in the form of raster-based (grid) data or polygons. Examples of raster-based data include water-table depths and elevations, tops and thicknesses of geologic and aquifer units, and aquifer transmissivity. Examples of polygons include surficial geology and groundwater recharge potential.

The intent of developing a web-technology enabled system is to provide a more intuitive and comprehensive toolset for locating, quickly viewing, and downloading the desired information in an efficient, extensible, and familiar manner.

Presentation on national LiDAR applications and benefits

Date

William S. Schenck, of the Delaware Geological Survey, gave a presentation at the Association of American Geographers annual meeting, Washington, D.C., April 14. The paper was titled "National LiDAR Applications and Benefits: A Perspective from the States."

A GIS screening tool for assessing suitability of land for RIBS

Date

Scott Andres and Edward Walther, of the Delaware Geological Survey, presented "Development and Application of a GIS Screening Tool for Assessing Suitability of Land for Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems" at the National Ground Water Association Summit, Denver, April 12-15. Andres also participated in a panel discussion co-sponsored by the U.S. Subcommittee on Groundwater, "National Groundwater Monitoring Network: Listening Session."

DataMIL receives USGS John Wesley Powell Award

A team of state and University of Delaware staff has been awarded the 2003 John Wesley Powell award "for noteworthy contributions to the mission and objectives of the U. S. Geological Survey." The group was honored for developing the Delaware Data Mapping and Integration Laboratory (DataMIL).

The Delaware DataMIL Gets a New Look!

The Delaware DataMIL was redesigned to take advantage of more modern web technologies as well as to answer key feature requests to the system. In particular, new additions to the DataMIL include: complete FGDC metadata for all layers, a map previewer embedded into the metadata catalog, and the ability for all datasets (vector and raster) to downloaded as raw GIS data files as well as ArcIMS and WMS map services

UD hosts first-ever Geospatial Research Day

Date

The University of Delaware's first Geospatial Research Day took place in the Trabant University Center on Thursday, Nov. 19. The free event highlighted the geospatial research being conducted at the University of Delaware and the ways in which UD community members are using geospatial technology.

IS6 Delaware's State Boundaries

One hundred seventy-nine monuments help to mark Delaware's boundaries with Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Although there are only four major boundaries, there are seven boundary lines that make up the confines of the State. They are the east-west boundary, or Transpeninsular Line; the north-south boundary, or the Tangent Line, Arc, and North lines;; the Delaware-Pennsylvania boundary, including the Top of the Wedge Line and the 12-mile Circle; and the Delaware-New Jersey boundary including the 1934 Mean Low Water Line and the Delaware Bay Line.

DGS Digital Datasets

In the same ways as our printed publications, digital data released by the DGS represent the results of original professional research and as such are used by professionals and the public.

RI74 Locating Ground-Water Discharge Areas in Rehoboth and Indian River Bays and Indian River, Delaware Using Landsat 7 Imagery

Delaware’s Inland Bays in southeastern Sussex County are valuable natural resources that have been experiencing environmental degradation since the late 1960s. Stresses on the water resource include land use practices, modifications of surface drainage, ground-water pumping, and wastewater disposal. One of the primary environmental problems in the Inland Bays is nutrient over-enrichment. Nitrogen and phosphorous loads are delivered to the bays by ground water, surface water, and air.