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Site content related to keyword: "Atlantic Coast"

Coastal flood workshop - UD, organizations collaborate to improve Mid-Atlantic coastal resiliency

Sea-level rise, dissipating dunes and susceptibility to storm surges are a few of the factors that contribute to a vulnerable coast. A coast at risk means an increased potential for damage to coastal communities and ecosystems in the event of tropical systems, nor'easters or other damaging weather.

More than 40 experts representing state and federal agencies and regional universities gathered to discuss these and other important issues during the Coastal Flood Research, Modeling and Monitoring Workshop on Sept. 16.

OFR50 Database of Quaternary Coastal Geochronologic Information for the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts of North America (additional information for sites in Peru and Chile)

OFR50 Database of Quaternary Coastal Geochronologic Information for the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts of North America

Open-File Report 50 presents and describes a database of geochronological information for coastal deposits of the US Atlantic and Pacific coasts, as well as for sites from the Pacific coast of South America. This database represents a synthesis of nearly forty years of study conducted by John F. Wehmiller and students in the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Delaware, as well as many collaborating colleagues. The majority of the chronological information in the database is based on amino acid racemization (AAR) data for fossil mollusks obtained from over 1000 collection sites. These chronological data have been used for various mapping, paleoenvironmental, stratigraphic, sea-level, and tectonic studies. In addition to the database itself, 18 on-line supplements containing information related to sample descriptions, sample and collection site photographs, field notes, supporting or related analytical data, and laboratory publications and technical reports are available. Periodic updates and additions will be made where appropriate. The database will be updated regularly to add new data or to complete entries that are currently blank. The instructions provided with the database indicate the date of the latest revision, as well as all revisions after the first release. Some output data from the Amino Acid Racemization Data Base (AARDB) are available at on-line mapping sites or are posted to the NOAA-World Data Center for archival preservation (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/aar.html). The Journal copy of this report is available through Elsevier at http://authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S2214242815000170.

Amino Acid Racemization Data Base (AARDB)

Amino Acid Racemization Data  Base (AARDB)

Open-File Report 50 presents and describes a database of geochronological information for coastal deposits of the US Atlantic and Pacific coasts, as well as for sites from the Pacific coast of South America. This database represents a synthesis of nearly forty years of study conducted by John F. Wehmiller and students in the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Delaware, as well as many collaborating colleagues. The majority of the chronological information in the database is based on amino acid racemization (AAR) data for fossil mollusks obtained from over 1000 collection sites. These chronological data have been used for various mapping, paleoenvironmental, stratigraphic, sea-level, and tectonic studies. In addition to the database itself, 18 on-line supplements containing information related to sample descriptions, sample and collection site photographs, field notes, supporting or related analytical data, and laboratory publications and technical reports are available. Periodic updates and additions will be made where appropriate. The database will be updated regularly to add new data or to complete entries that are currently blank. The instructions provided with the database indicate the date of the latest revision, as well as all revisions after the first release. Some output data from the Amino Acid Racemization Data Base (AARDB) are available at on-line mapping sites or are posted to the NOAA-World Data Center for archival preservation (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/aar.html).