Delaware

Senate Bill 129 Created the Delaware Geological Survey June 4, 1951

Governor Elbert N. Carvel promoted legislation, with regard to water resources, with Seante Bill 129 which created the Delaware Geological Survey, introduced by State Senator William O. Cubbage in the 116 General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Carvel on June 4, 1951.

B9 Stratigraphy of the Sedimentary Rocks of Delaware

The stratigraphy of the Coastal Plain of Delaware is discussed with emphasis placed upon an appraisal of the stratigraphic nomenclature. A revised stratigraphic column for Delaware is proposed. Rock stratigraphic units, based mainly on data from certain key wells, are described and the published names which have been or which might conceivably be applied to those units are reviewed. In each case a name is chosen and the reasons for the choice are stated. The relationships between the column established for Delaware and the recognized columns for adjacent states are considered.

IS6 Delaware's State Boundaries

One hundred seventy-nine monuments help to mark Delaware's boundaries with Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Although there are only four major boundaries, there are seven boundary lines that make up the confines of the State. They are the east-west boundary, or Transpeninsular Line; the north-south boundary, or the Tangent Line, Arc, and North lines;; the Delaware-Pennsylvania boundary, including the Top of the Wedge Line and the 12-mile Circle; and the Delaware-New Jersey boundary including the 1934 Mean Low Water Line and the Delaware Bay Line.

Earthquake Felt Report

Please answer every question to the best of your ability. Either fill in the blanks where called for, or check the response that best describes the event. If a question does not apply or if you don't know how to respond to a particular question, simply skip it and go on to the next. Feel free to add additional information in the Additional Comments box at the bottom of the form.

RI72 Geology and Extent of the Confined Aquifers of Kent County, Delaware

Ground water comprises nearly all of the water supply in Kent County, Delaware. The confined aquifers of the area are an important part of this resource base. The aim of this study is to provide an up-to-date geologic framework for the confined aquifers of Kent County, with a focus on their stratigraphy and correlation. Seven confined aquifers are used for water supply in Kent County. All occur at progressively greater depths south-southeastward, paralleling the overall dip of the sedimentary section that underlies the state.