Delaware

Presentation on land application of waste water

Date

Scott Andres of the Delaware Geological Survey presented “Land application of wastewater” and participated in a panel discussion of land use effects on water resources at a forum sponsored by the Sussex County League of Women Voters in Georgetown, Del., Jan 13.
Also, Andres presented “Groundwater Resources and Ag Water Use in Delaware” at the irrigation session during Delaware Ag Week in Harrington, Del., Jan 20.

Hydrologic Information for Delaware

Hydrogeologic data and information for Delaware. This includes the Water Conditions Report, groundwater well data, links to real-time data from DEOS and USGS, and other general information about Delaware's hydrogeology.

Senate Bill 129 Created the Delaware Geological Survey June 4, 1951

Governor Elbert N. Carvel promoted legislation, with regard to water resources, with Seante Bill 129 which created the Delaware Geological Survey, introduced by State Senator William O. Cubbage in the 116 General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Carvel on June 4, 1951.

B9 Stratigraphy of the Sedimentary Rocks of Delaware

The stratigraphy of the Coastal Plain of Delaware is discussed with emphasis placed upon an appraisal of the stratigraphic nomenclature. A revised stratigraphic column for Delaware is proposed. Rock stratigraphic units, based mainly on data from certain key wells, are described and the published names which have been or which might conceivably be applied to those units are reviewed. In each case a name is chosen and the reasons for the choice are stated. The relationships between the column established for Delaware and the recognized columns for adjacent states are considered.

IS6 Delaware's State Boundaries

One hundred seventy-nine monuments help to mark Delaware's boundaries with Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Although there are only four major boundaries, there are seven boundary lines that make up the confines of the State. They are the east-west boundary, or Transpeninsular Line; the north-south boundary, or the Tangent Line, Arc, and North lines;; the Delaware-Pennsylvania boundary, including the Top of the Wedge Line and the 12-mile Circle; and the Delaware-New Jersey boundary including the 1934 Mean Low Water Line and the Delaware Bay Line.