Share

DGS Annual Report

DGS Annual Report of Programs and Activities.

Click here to download!

Delaware Geological Survey releases new geologic map of Seaford Area

Printer-friendly
September 4, 2015

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Seaford area titled Geologic Map of the Seaford West and Seaford East Quadrangles, Delaware.

Geologic Map 23 presents the results of research by Jaime L. Tomlinson, Kelvin W. Ramsey, and A. Scott Andres of the DGS. The map is an update of the surficial geology of DGS Geologic Map No. 9: Geology of the Seaford Area, Delaware by A. Scott Andres and Kelvin W. Ramsey (1995).

The updated map provides continuity of surficial stratigraphic units with recently mapped adjacent quadrangles and reflects interpretations regarding the Quaternary stratigraphy of Sussex County published by the DGS in 2010 (DGS Report of Investigations No. 76: Stratigraphy, Correlation, and Depositional Environments of the Middle to Late Pleistocene Interglacial Deposits of Southern Delaware by K.W. Ramsey).

For the updates, new data were utilized, such as LiDAR data not available in 1995, and geologic data from recent drill holes and hand augers.

Geologic Map 23 illustrates and describes the geologic units found at the land surface and in the shallow subsurface in the map area. It contains detailed descriptions and ages of all units presented on the map as well as a cross section that shows the geology and names of units underlying the units exposed at the land’s surface.

The map provides geologic information for use in regulatory land-use decision making, delineation and protection of water resources, and to identify potential sand and gravel resources.

When used in conjunction with supporting subsurface geologic information, the map can aid in locating water supplies for public, domestic, agricultural, and industrial use, for mapping groundwater recharge areas, and for protecting groundwater and surface-water resources in parts of Sussex County.

The map is part of the Delaware Geological Survey’s ongoing mission to understand geologic and hydrologic systems and to advise, inform, and educate Delawareans about the results of such investigations for use in issues regarding surface and groundwater resources, agriculture, economic development, land-use planning, environmental protection, resource evaluation, engineering applications, hazard identification and mitigation, and recreation.

For questions and information, contact DGS at
delgeosurvey@udel.edu, 302-831-2833